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Art Downtown hosting Trash to Treasure exhibit

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

In this consumer-driven, throw-away world, a group of artists is taking a stand.

Sue Stonesifer wine bottles 092017Instead of unwrapping a pristine canvas, they’re re-purposing an extra kitchen cabinet. Rather than throw out an Adirondack chair well past its prime, it’s now the centerpiece of the show. License plates, old spoons, wine bottles and scrap fabric have gained new life at Art Downtown.
The exhibit — Trash to Treasure: Re-Purposed Objects Become Art — continues throughFenton Stormes V8 092017 Sept. 30. https://www.facebook.com/hanovereveningsun/videos/1563278623729257/?hc_ref=ARTaJb2Ohvmk-w7yEefGHQAcXwdCNIOUK4Norbe5XtQzY2y7jLASaGqt9uDtC1kV4Z8
It can be seen during regular gallery hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. The gallery is always free.

Susan Runkle Chair 092017
Jane West, who leads the committee that hangs new shows every month, conceived of the idea for the show. But Eric Miller, who helps organize the shows for the Hanover Area Arts Guild, knew the Trash to Treasure show was a risk.
Kirby M Heltebridle Wired 092017The Arts Guild has always had a handful of Found Art craftsman. John Sokolovich is known for his metal sculptures as is Jeff Asper. Jim Mackey’s wall hangings as well as his other 3-D sculpture work have gotten notice at the Arts Guild along with other galleries and Matthew Mackey is following in his footsteps.
“Trash” figures prominently in other artists’ work as well. Kim Asper’s vintage store isDon Atkinson Old Rugged Cross 092017 thriving. Sue Stonesifer creates art using discarded wine bottles and Barb Geesey’s dolls begin with a wine bottle as a base.Jennifer Savo Sitting Bull 092017
It’s all trash but it’s treasured.
“I’m impressed with the variety of artwork,” said Eric Miller, who leads the Arts Guild’s Show Committee, “how much creativity people really have.”

Re-purposed art refers to objects made from old, used “thow-away” items — tools, furniture, silverware, clocks, picture frames, license plates, cupboard doors — that have been re-invented, re-combined, re-finished to become a new art piece.

Matthew Mackey The Key 092017Vinyl records, skids, license plates, wine bottles and old cabinet doors now are works of art.

For one of the artists — Susan Runkle of  Seven Valleys, Pa. — it’s just another form of expression.

Her usual medium is acrylic paintings and color pencils.

But sometimes, when she sees a chair she likes, she just can’t help herself.

It comes home with her and gets a redo. It goes from a beat-up piece of piece of furniture in a junk store to beauty in Runkle’s home. And in September, she’s showing it off at Art Downtown.

Don Atkinson, of Camp Hill, Pa., has a background in art and photography. But now, he Jaime Shoul Coffee Pot 092017.jpgwork is in the technical field. So creating beauty — like his skid art — is a fantastic hobby for him.

“I love building things,” he said. “I draw out what I envision and then I start building and then I look at what pieces of wood I have.”

He uses reclaimed wood and skids to create his art pieces, with his first piece fashioned from an old fence.

Jaime Shoul of Hanover isn’t sure what to call his pieces — a hobby, art or a second career.

“It’s creative. It’s fun,” he said, adding he wanted to do something with his knowledge from a career as a mechanic but wasn’t so sure he wanted to follow in the Steampunk tradition.

Sharon Benner Scrap Quilt 092017.jpgInstead, he takes vintage items, like a coffee pot or light from radio from the 1950s, and converts them into lights.

“I see people that make things like that and I want to make it better,” he said.

Artists included in the show are Atkinson; Shoul; Barb Geesey, Kirby M. Heltebridle, Vicki Lamb, Sharon Benner, Sue Stonesifer and Fenton Stormes of Hanover; Janet Short of Thomasville; Jeff Asper and Kim Asper of New Oxford; Jim Mackey and Matthew Mackey of Gettysburg; Jennifer Savo of Camp Hill; and Vickie Curtis and Joanne Bast of Littlestown.

A reception for the artists, their families and the community is planned 5-7 p.m. Sept. 8 at Art Downtown. It is free and open to the public.

The exhibit can be seen during regular gallery hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of the Art Downtown gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild. She can be reached at info@hanoverareaarts.com or 717-632-2521.

 

 

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Stephanie O’Brien answers five questions about her life in art

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Stephanie OBrien 082017 1Why do you do what you do?

“I do it for me. It’s a way to my own therapy,” Stephanie said. She’s a clinical therapist, concentrating on child and family therapy. “Play is the essence of life.” Stephanie is a thread and fabric artist as well as a painter. She experiments in all mediums, she added.

What’s surprised you most about your life in art?

“That it’s there. I always love it,” OBrien comboshe said. “I absolutely like that secret place where I’m immersed in art.” Children, she continued, have it, but when adults find that gift in art, it’s really “awesome.”

If you could have a do-over in art, what would it be?

Stephanie OBrien draw and color 072016Stephanie said she would like to have more confidence in her art. “My sister said to me about a year ago, you are an artist. I wish I had not denied that an earlier age.”

What are you best at?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 4“I don’t think we live in isolation,” Stephanie said. “We live in the moment.” And, she continued, is essence of art and being in the moment.

 

What’s next?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 9More exploring, more experimenting, she said. “I do a lot of sewing and want to continue combining with fabric art.”

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of Art Downtown, the gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild in downtown Hanover. She can be reached at 717-632-2521 or info@hanoverareaarts.com

Stephanie O’Brien answers five questions about her life in art

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Stephanie OBrien 082017 1Why do you do what you do?

“I do it for me. It’s a way to my own therapy,” Stephanie said. She’s a clinical therapist, concentrating on child and family therapy. “Play is the essence of life.” Stephanie is a thread and fabric artist as well as a painter. She experiments in all mediums, she added.

What’s surprised you most about your life in art?

“That it’s there. I always love it,” OBrien comboshe said. “I absolutely like that secret place where I’m immersed in art.” Children, she continued, have it, but when adults find that gift in art, it’s really “awesome.”

If you could have a do-over in art, what would it be?

Stephanie OBrien draw and color 072016Stephanie said she would like to have more confidence in her art. “My sister said to me about a year ago, you are an artist. I wish I had not denied that an earlier age.”

What are you best at?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 4“I don’t think we live in isolation,” Stephanie said. “We live in the moment.” And, she continued, is essence of art and being in the moment.

 

What’s next?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 9More exploring, more experimenting, she said. “I do a lot of sewing and want to continue combining with fabric art.”

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of Art Downtown, the gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild in downtown Hanover. She can be reached at 717-632-2521 or info@hanoverareaarts.com

Bria is president of Hanover Area Arts Guild

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Margaret Bria has returned to lead the Hanover Area Arts Guild as president.

Ironically, after spending 50 years in the courtroom as a district judge, Bria now will help the Arts Guild celebrate its 50th year in 2018.

She was elected as a board member during the Annual All-Member Meeting in June. Also elected at that time were returning board members Jennifer Riggs, Rebecca Yates Shorb and Sue Stonesifer, all of Hanover, who will serve for new three-year terms.

Sharon Benner, of Hanover, was elected to a three-year term on the Board of Trustees. She has served in that capacity in the past.

South Hills west No 5 by Margaret BriaIn July, Bria was elected president of the Trustees. Officers serving with her will be Sara Little of Hanover, as vice president; Julie Miller of Hanover, as secretary; and Kim Asper of New Oxford, as treasurer. Little, Miller and Asper have previously served in their positions with the Arts Guild.

Bria, too, was president in previous years. In fact, she expected to leave the Board of Trustees, which is a working board, often spending hours at the downtown Hanover facility as well as serving on various committees and organizing events.

Bria’s journey to the Arts Guild began when she retired in 1997 as a magisterial district judge. Bria had served in Penn and West Manheim townships and in the Borough of Jefferson. She started her judicial career, she explained, as a 26-year-old.Outdoor Beauty by Margaret Bria

“I was a Justice of the Peace,” she said, adding she was appointed and took numerous certifications and training courses over the years for her position. Eventually it became an elected post and she successfully ran for election.

After her official retirement in 1997, she took senior status, allowing her to work at various locations, for as short or as long as needed.

Ruger - Margaret Bria_edited-1Then, in 2016, when her daughter decided to seek office, Bria retired for good.

But it was the 1997 “retirement” that sent her to the Arts Guild. That year sent her to oil painting classes with Steve Stroup in Hanover. He saw her art potential and also steered toward the Arts Guild.

“It’s just a hobby,” she explained, adding Stroup also made sure to get her involved on the Arts Guild Board of Trustees.

Bennet by Margaret BriaBria served for a long time as the board’s Property Treasurer, handling rental income and expenses.

The coming year will be an exciting one, she said, with the 50th anniversary.

“I’m always up for an improvement,” she said, adding she loved to help people learn about the Arts Guild.

Bria, married to husband Pat, has four children and four grandchildren.

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of the Art Downtown gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild. She can be reached at info@hanoverareaarts.com or 717-632-2521.

Morgan Bair wins annual scholarship from Arts Guild

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Art is everything to Morgan Bair.

It’s something she plans to pursue — specifically interior design and interior architecture — at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. http://www.iup.edu/hdes/interior-design/interior-design-bs/

Bair, a graduate of Spring Grove Area High School, is this year’s winner of the Hanover Area Arts Guild annual $1,000 scholarship.

Morgan Bair 072017 dead of night-watercolor“Art has always been a part of my life,” Bair said. “It’s fun way to explain myself, to relax. It’s always there when I need it.”

Her choice of interior design is tied to her long-term goal; she wants to improve handicapped accessible designs for buildings.

“Not only will being an interior design major give me the opportunity to make a building look beautiful, but as an architectural design student, I will learn to make a building functional and safe,” Bair said.

“I want to make a different with art,” she continued.

She’s already gained some experience. Bair completed indoor and outdoor renderings ofMorgan Bair 072017 peace-pen the pool at the Hanover Country Club. That led to similar job — renderings of the Tech Building for the Spring Grove Area School District.

Also Spring Grove, Bair is president of the National Art Honor Society and recently started oil painting. “It’s something different. It’s something unique to me,” she explained.

In addition, she played volleyball for four years, the last two on varsity, and indoor track and field for two years, as a triple jumper.

She lives in Spring Grove with her grandparents, Norma and Warren “Blake” Bair. She is the daughter of Jaclyn Bair and has a brother, A.J. Bair.

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of the Art Downtown gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild. She can be reached at info@hanoverareaarts.com or 717-632-2521.