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Stephanie O’Brien answers five questions about her life in art

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Stephanie OBrien 082017 1Why do you do what you do?

“I do it for me. It’s a way to my own therapy,” Stephanie said. She’s a clinical therapist, concentrating on child and family therapy. “Play is the essence of life.” Stephanie is a thread and fabric artist as well as a painter. She experiments in all mediums, she added.

What’s surprised you most about your life in art?

“That it’s there. I always love it,” OBrien comboshe said. “I absolutely like that secret place where I’m immersed in art.” Children, she continued, have it, but when adults find that gift in art, it’s really “awesome.”

If you could have a do-over in art, what would it be?

Stephanie OBrien draw and color 072016Stephanie said she would like to have more confidence in her art. “My sister said to me about a year ago, you are an artist. I wish I had not denied that an earlier age.”

What are you best at?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 4“I don’t think we live in isolation,” Stephanie said. “We live in the moment.” And, she continued, is essence of art and being in the moment.

 

What’s next?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 9More exploring, more experimenting, she said. “I do a lot of sewing and want to continue combining with fabric art.”

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of Art Downtown, the gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild in downtown Hanover. She can be reached at 717-632-2521 or info@hanoverareaarts.com

Stephanie O’Brien answers five questions about her life in art

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Stephanie OBrien 082017 1Why do you do what you do?

“I do it for me. It’s a way to my own therapy,” Stephanie said. She’s a clinical therapist, concentrating on child and family therapy. “Play is the essence of life.” Stephanie is a thread and fabric artist as well as a painter. She experiments in all mediums, she added.

What’s surprised you most about your life in art?

“That it’s there. I always love it,” OBrien comboshe said. “I absolutely like that secret place where I’m immersed in art.” Children, she continued, have it, but when adults find that gift in art, it’s really “awesome.”

If you could have a do-over in art, what would it be?

Stephanie OBrien draw and color 072016Stephanie said she would like to have more confidence in her art. “My sister said to me about a year ago, you are an artist. I wish I had not denied that an earlier age.”

What are you best at?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 4“I don’t think we live in isolation,” Stephanie said. “We live in the moment.” And, she continued, is essence of art and being in the moment.

 

What’s next?

Stephanie OBrien 082017 9More exploring, more experimenting, she said. “I do a lot of sewing and want to continue combining with fabric art.”

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of Art Downtown, the gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild in downtown Hanover. She can be reached at 717-632-2521 or info@hanoverareaarts.com

Bria is president of Hanover Area Arts Guild

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Margaret Bria has returned to lead the Hanover Area Arts Guild as president.

Ironically, after spending 50 years in the courtroom as a district judge, Bria now will help the Arts Guild celebrate its 50th year in 2018.

She was elected as a board member during the Annual All-Member Meeting in June. Also elected at that time were returning board members Jennifer Riggs, Rebecca Yates Shorb and Sue Stonesifer, all of Hanover, who will serve for new three-year terms.

Sharon Benner, of Hanover, was elected to a three-year term on the Board of Trustees. She has served in that capacity in the past.

South Hills west No 5 by Margaret BriaIn July, Bria was elected president of the Trustees. Officers serving with her will be Sara Little of Hanover, as vice president; Julie Miller of Hanover, as secretary; and Kim Asper of New Oxford, as treasurer. Little, Miller and Asper have previously served in their positions with the Arts Guild.

Bria, too, was president in previous years. In fact, she expected to leave the Board of Trustees, which is a working board, often spending hours at the downtown Hanover facility as well as serving on various committees and organizing events.

Bria’s journey to the Arts Guild began when she retired in 1997 as a magisterial district judge. Bria had served in Penn and West Manheim townships and in the Borough of Jefferson. She started her judicial career, she explained, as a 26-year-old.Outdoor Beauty by Margaret Bria

“I was a Justice of the Peace,” she said, adding she was appointed and took numerous certifications and training courses over the years for her position. Eventually it became an elected post and she successfully ran for election.

After her official retirement in 1997, she took senior status, allowing her to work at various locations, for as short or as long as needed.

Ruger - Margaret Bria_edited-1Then, in 2016, when her daughter decided to seek office, Bria retired for good.

But it was the 1997 “retirement” that sent her to the Arts Guild. That year sent her to oil painting classes with Steve Stroup in Hanover. He saw her art potential and also steered toward the Arts Guild.

“It’s just a hobby,” she explained, adding Stroup also made sure to get her involved on the Arts Guild Board of Trustees.

Bennet by Margaret BriaBria served for a long time as the board’s Property Treasurer, handling rental income and expenses.

The coming year will be an exciting one, she said, with the 50th anniversary.

“I’m always up for an improvement,” she said, adding she loved to help people learn about the Arts Guild.

Bria, married to husband Pat, has four children and four grandchildren.

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of the Art Downtown gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild. She can be reached at info@hanoverareaarts.com or 717-632-2521.

Morgan Bair wins annual scholarship from Arts Guild

Sunday With The Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

Art is everything to Morgan Bair.

It’s something she plans to pursue — specifically interior design and interior architecture — at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. http://www.iup.edu/hdes/interior-design/interior-design-bs/

Bair, a graduate of Spring Grove Area High School, is this year’s winner of the Hanover Area Arts Guild annual $1,000 scholarship.

Morgan Bair 072017 dead of night-watercolor“Art has always been a part of my life,” Bair said. “It’s fun way to explain myself, to relax. It’s always there when I need it.”

Her choice of interior design is tied to her long-term goal; she wants to improve handicapped accessible designs for buildings.

“Not only will being an interior design major give me the opportunity to make a building look beautiful, but as an architectural design student, I will learn to make a building functional and safe,” Bair said.

“I want to make a different with art,” she continued.

She’s already gained some experience. Bair completed indoor and outdoor renderings ofMorgan Bair 072017 peace-pen the pool at the Hanover Country Club. That led to similar job — renderings of the Tech Building for the Spring Grove Area School District.

Also Spring Grove, Bair is president of the National Art Honor Society and recently started oil painting. “It’s something different. It’s something unique to me,” she explained.

In addition, she played volleyball for four years, the last two on varsity, and indoor track and field for two years, as a triple jumper.

She lives in Spring Grove with her grandparents, Norma and Warren “Blake” Bair. She is the daughter of Jaclyn Bair and has a brother, A.J. Bair.

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of the Art Downtown gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild. She can be reached at info@hanoverareaarts.com or 717-632-2521.

 

 

Artists share ‘best advice’

Sunday with the Arts

By TERESA M. PIRKEY

It’s free. It’s cheap. And you get a lot of it.

But how much advice do you really remember?

Members of the Hanover Area Arts Guild offered their opinions this week:

“Know who you are and that your art is a reflection of that,” said Carla Long, a Hanover photographer who often teaches photography at Art Downtown. Kirsten Lewis, who instructs a Creative Live photography workshop, she said, imparted that advice.

Long is trained as an accountant. Her creative side didn’t surface until later after some soul searching, something she said is essential for artists.

“You have to find your own voice,” Long said.

Margery Erickson 2 072017Margery Erickson speaks through a threaded loom, where she creates her fine fabrics for shawls, capes and scarves.

The advice she remembers most often came from Randall Darwall, a colorist and weaver.

“He told me to always weave with finer yarns,” Erickson said, adding it’s something she has practiced to this day. She often experiments with different yarns and colors. “It’s mostly doing it and seeing what happens.”

Margery Erickson 3 072017“I weave a fabric. I don’t like but someone else does,” she said, recalling a popular red and orange fabric that she made, one she strongly disliked. “It’s all about watching what the public buys.”

Apparently, it’s working. Since she’s retired, Erickson’s hobby has grown into a part-time business, selling her weavings as well as refurbishing equipment and dying yarn.

A Special Time by Margaret HullPeggy Hull has been painting since the 1980s. And the advice she received along the way has almost become her mantra.

“Be sure to paint what you really see,” she said. “I have to remind myself to do that all the time.”

Hull is an oil painter and would like to try watercolors some. She’s painted with some of the Arts Guild’s long-time instructors — Steve Stroup, Ron Schloyer and Sharon Benner.

In comparison, Julie Mosebrook is a rookie. She’s only been a glass artist for about six years.

The Abbottstown woman can look to a Gettysburg to artisan for the best advice, given when Mosebrook was just starting out.

“Just use your imagination,” Mosebrook remembers her saying.

Apparently, the advice stuck.

Teresa M. Pirkey is manager of the Art Downtown gallery of the Hanover Area Arts Guild. She can be reached at info@hanoverareaarts.com or 717-632-2521.